Past saturday, I could attend to the Second edition of Women Tech Makers in Madrid, a conference that gives visibility to women in tech and encourages them to give talks in a welcoming environment.

Women Tech Makers in Madrid
After a successful first edition, the organizers tried a bigger event. The team, headed by Laura Morillo and with the help of a wonderful group of women, accepted the challenge of scaling from 1 track to 2, and from 150 attendees to 200. Apart from growing the event, they took notice of the feedback of the last year and improved signifincantly the catering, they added slots for smal talks, offered workshops for children and adults… It was an amazing success.

During all the day we could attend to technical talks given by women: 30 women, of different ages and profiles teaching about technology, methodologies, workflows, mentoring… Some of the talks that were specially interesting for me were:

  • Internet of Things para todos ¿qué cosas podemos hacer con las Cosas?: Marta Beltrán gave us a fantastic overview about IoT next challenges. On one hand, there is a huge diversity in protocols and technologies which will need to converge; on the other hand, legislation is a step before technology, which fosters any kind of opportunities. Finally, “the forgotten” security and privacy, a challenge for both manufacturers and platform providers.

  • Beneficios de las infraestructuras efímeras: Eloísa Ibáñez introduced the concept of “ephemeral infraestructures” and highlighted the cost saving as a key factor to adopt this kind of practices in a company. Because the audience were diverse, Eloísa could not give more detail, but I’d love to see that talk with much more depth.

  • Consensual Software: Prioritizing Trust & Safety for new features: Danielle Leong is part of the Github team in charge of safety environments in development teams. She enforces the idea of consensual software, which means: every time we build software that implies interactions between users, make those interaction explicitly consensual. This is specially importante to guarantee that our application will not serve to users that want to harass other users. Again, victims tend to be women and other underrepresented groups. The message is that we, as developers, can help to build applications that are trusty and consensual for everyone.

In addition to the interesting conteng of talks and workshops, this conference proves that there are women who have something to say about technology; if your event doesn’t improve its diversity stats, maybe you should stop searching for the reason in the pipeline (“women don’t apply to the C4P”), and start looking around your own strategy.

This year Kaleidos was in charge of the gift to the speakers. For us, this is a great opportunity to contribute with Women Tech Makers, but also the perfect excuse to make a special gift: a book about fearless pioneers women beautifully ilustrated.

I’m very grateful to the organizers of the event for their effort, and to all the people who shared some good moments with me. See you next year :)